DIY window farms

Pin It

if you’re an urban dweller without access to soil, you have a inclination towards DIY projects, AND you’ve always wanted to be a farmer, you better pay attention to this post.  window farming is a growing system that allows for year-round farming in almost any window.  basically, the plants capture the natural light and vertically disperses the organic liquid soil throughout the levels of plants. not only does the window farm look cool in your apartment, but it also can freshen up the place.

windowfarms.org was started by Britta Riley, who raised $27,000 in donations as seed money.  now her site has 4,000 registered users who all manage window farms of their own.

 Riley states,  ”putting recycled consumer goods to use is an important part of the DIY ethic.  we’re kind of showing that we can actually get really, really far using things that we already have available to us as consumers.”

the DIY instructions on the site tell you what you need, to start the materials will cost about $30.  you can download the PDF from the website here. the basic set up includes three bottles that will hold the plants, a bottom reservoir that will capture and hold the water, and tubes so that the water can move through the system.  the water is elevated through the tubes via a small air pump, and then the water can trickle down in and out of each plant.

window farms have been used to grow peppers, strawberries, cherry tomatoes, bok choi and butter crunch lettuce to name a few. root vegetables, however, are not good candidates for the window farm.

if you think this undertaking is too big, you can buy a window farm kit from their site, making it even easier for you to have fresh vegetables growing in your home.  definitely going to try this.

images: 1: Screenshot, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6




  • Spying The Best
  • http://twitter.com/detroitjetaime detroitjetaime

    Thank you, it’s an amazing concept! We just used your picture on our facebook page, sharing your link. We’d love to get in touch! Helene and Nora, the filmmakers from http://www.detroitjetaime.com.

  • Sheilabt6260

    What a great idea, growing food and recycling at the same time! This is great for those who do not have open spaces to grow. Thanks for sharing!